September 2016
Health Technology Assessment 2016. Vol.20, No.73

NHS Intrabeam

An international randomised controlled trial to compare TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (TARGIT) with conventional postoperative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for women with early-stage breast cancer (the TARGIT-A trial).

NHS Intrabeam Paper


May 2016
redjournal.org

Cosmesis and breast-related quality of life outcomes following intra-operative radiotherapy for early breast cancer

A sub-study of the TARGIT-A trial.

Read the manuscript here…


May 2016
youtube.com

Environmental and Social Benefits of TARGIT IORT for Breast Cancer

Environmental and social benefits of the targeted intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

Watch the clip here…


August 2015
nzdoctor.co.nz

How ought New Zealand approach IORT? A cancer therapy controversy brews

Specialists are deeply divided on where to next for targeted, one-dose radiation, a technology that has met with “vitriol” internationally, according to the breast cancer surgeon who brought it to New Zealand.

Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) has generated “an extraordinary amount of vitriol worldwide”, says Erica Whineray Kelly, who led the introduction of Intrabeam equipment almost two years ago.

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October 2014
clevelandclinic.org

Cleveland Clinic Unveils Top 10 Medical Innovations for 2015

Finding and treating breast cancer in its earliest stages can oftentimes lead to a cure.

Continue reading…


October 2014
danvers.wickedlocal.com

Lahey pioneers new treatment option

The Comprehensive Breast Health Center at the Lahey Medical Center in Peabody has recently begun offering a new method of treating breast cancer in its early stages.

Called IORT – inter-operative radiation therapy – the treatment uses a portable machine called an intrabeam to administer radiation while the patient is having a lumpectomy.

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October 2014
www.news10.net

What advancements have been made in breast cancer treatment?

October 1 marked the beginning of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. It’s when we talk about walks, runs, football teams wearing pink jerseys and more – all for awareness.

But, what advancements have been made in breast cancer treatment?

Continue reading and to watch the clip…


August 2014
Sunday Star Times

Westpac Women of Influence Awards 2014. Finalist

Women stand tall and proud. Congratulations to Erica Whineray Kelly who is a finalist in the Westpac Women of Influence Awards 2014 in the Science and Innovation section for her work in introducing Intrabeam to New Zealand.

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July 2014
www.bbc.co.uk

Breast cancer: One-shot therapy gets NHS nod

A pioneering breast cancer treatment that replaces weeks of radiotherapy with a single, targeted shot is set to be offered on the NHS. The dose of radiation is delivered from inside the breast, once a tumour has been removed in surgery.

It would benefit up to 36,000 people and should also save the NHS money.

Draft guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) said it would improve patients’ quality of life. The technique, called intra-operative radiation, is suitable only for patients who have caught their cancer early.

Continue reading…


July 2014
www.bbc.co.uk

Professor Tobias interviews on BBC Radio 4

Listen to Professor Tobias, Professor of cancer medicine at UCL and a lead radiation oncologist for the study of breast cancer, discuss Intraoperative radiotherapy.

Professor Tobias interviews at: 02:34:17 to 02:39:18

Click to listen…


August 2014
www.dailymail.co.uk

Half-hour breast cancer treatment can replace weeks of radiotherapy

Tens of thousands of women with breast cancer could soon be offered a single 30-minute shot of radiotherapy, sparing them weeks of exhausting treatment.

The new treatment called intrabeam radiotherapy is delivered during surgery, while the patient is still under anaesthetic.

Continue reading…


July 2014
news.sky.com

Single-Shot Radiotherapy For Breast Cancer

A new type of radiotherapy which could be delivered in a single dose during surgery is offering new hope for tens of thousands of women with breast cancer.

Intrabeam radiotherapy has been given provisional go-ahead for NHS use by the National Institute for Health and Care excellence (Nice).

Continue reading…


July 2014
www.huffingtonpost.co.uk

New ‘Revolutionary’ Radiotherapy Treatment Could Benefit Breast Cancer Patients

Every year, around 41,500 women and 300 men in the UK are diagnosed with breast cancer. The disease can have devastating consequences, but now there may be a new way to tackle it.

Tens of thousands of breast cancer sufferers could benefit from an “innovative” new type of radiotherapy which could be delivered during surgery instead of making them take a course of treatment.

Continue reading…


July 2014
www.telegraph.co.uk

Breast cancer patients to get new quick radiotherapy treatment

Breast cancer patients will be given a 20-minute one off dose of radiotherapy during surgery to remove their tumour instead of repeated visits afterwards, following approval by Nice.

Thousands of breast cancer patients will benefit from more convenient 20-minute one-off dose of radiotherapy after the NHS drugs rationing body approved a new technique.

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July 2014
www.theguardian.com

Single-dose radiotherapy could transform breast cancer treatment

Intrabeam radiotherapy, which has go-ahead for NHS use, is given during surgery, eliminating need for additional hospital trips.

Tens of thousands of breast cancer patients could benefit from a new type of radiotherapy which would be delivered during surgery instead of them having to take a course of treatment.

Continue reading…


February 2014
www.bnz.co.nz

Whatever it costs to make a difference

When a dying patient’s last request is for you to try harder, you’re going to honour it. No matter how long the hours, or how much it costs. You’ll try harder.

Continue reading…


February 2014
www.nzdoctor.co.nz

Fingers crossed for funding green light for new breast cancer radiation treatment

An Auckland breast cancer surgeon hopes the National Health Committee will today decide to publicly fund a new breast cancer radiation treatment.

Erica Whineray Kelly has spent the last few months contacting DHBs around the country and rallying support for the Intrabeam intraoperative radiation therapy machine to be offered through the public health system.

The machine, launched last October, replaces weeks of radiation therapy with asingle half-hour dose at the site of the tumour, and costs patients $8600 (New Zealand Doctor, 23 October 2013).


February 2014
www.nzdoctor.co.nz

Opportunity in waiting

So far, fewer than a dozen patients have undergone the treatment, and Dr Whineray Kelly says it is an opportunity-in-waiting.

Candidates for the treatment in New Zealand must be older than 50, and their tumour must be less than 3cm, grade 1 or 2, hormone-receptor-positive, node-negative, have clear margins and no lymphovascular invasion, she says.

Dr Whineray Kelly hopes the committee will decide to publicly fund the machine at a meeting today and expects to hear the result later this week.

Not all DHBs will need to purchase the machines; Dr Whineray Kelly envisions the treatment being offered by a few DHBs, which will become centres of excellence.


October 2013
www.tvnz.co.nz

New high tech weapon against breast cancer

An exciting advance for thousands of women diagnosed with early stage breast cancers is now available in New Zealand.

The machine is capable of eliminating weeks of waiting and treatment, reducing radiation therapy to a one-off, 30 minute dose.

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October 2013
www.tvnz.co.nz

Exciting advance in breast cancer treatment

One News <target=”_blank”>


October 2013
www.nzherald.co.nz

One dose treatment ‘exciting’

Two New Zealand breast cancer sufferers have been treated with an alternative to the usual weeks of radiation.

The Intrabeam intraoperative radiotherapy system, brought here by a team of Auckland breast cancer specialists, is a one-dose, one-time form of treatment and could revolutionise how breast cancer is treated.

Continue reading…


October 2013
www.3news.co.nz

One-dose breast cancer treatment rolled out

Two breast cancer patients have become the first women in New Zealand to be treated with a revolutionary, one-dose treatment.

The new system for early-stage treatment, called Introbeam intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT), enables the patient to avoid the traditional course of radiation, which can take up to six weeks – eliminating the need for as many as 25 post-op visits.

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October 2013
www.breastcancer.org.nz

INNOVATIVE NEW ONE-DOSE RADIATION THERAPY TREATMENT NOW AVAILABLE IN NEW ZEALAND

A revolutionary new radiation therapy technique is now available in New Zealand meaning some women with early breast cancer can have a single radiation treatment rather than weeks of therapy.

Focus Radiotherapy has introduced the Zeiss Intrabeam intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) system, in which a single dose of radiation is delivered during surgery for women undergoing breast conserving surgery. This eliminates the need for a further 25 visits to hospital for post-operative radiation therapy.

Continue reading…


October 2013
www.nzdoctor.co.nz

One Dose, One Time Early Stage Breast Cancer Treatment Comes to New Zealand

Media release from Focus Radiology

A team of Auckland breast cancer specialists is bringing an innovative one dose, one time treatment for women with certain types of early-stage breast cancer to New Zealand.

Continue reading…